Untitled Document

1. Assumption: The average length of stay for children coming to Liberty Youth Ranch is 5 years.

2 .Assumption: Liberty Youth Ranch will serve 16 children the first 5 years, 32 children the following 4 years, and 48 children the following 10 years. Children are in Liberty's care 365 days per year.

3. Assumption: Liberty Youth Ranch will serve 16 children the first 5 years, 32 children the following 4 years, and 48 children the following 10 years. Children are in Liberty's care 365 days per year and receive 3 meals per day.

4. Assumption: Liberty Youth Ranch will serve 16 children the first 5 years, 32 children the following 4 years, and 48 children the following 10 years. Children are required to attend school 188 days per year.

5. Assumption: Liberty Youth Ranch will serve 16 children the first 5 years, 32 children the following 4 years, and 48 children the following 10 years. Each child will receive 3 pairs of shoes per year.

6. Assumption: Liberty Youth Ranch will have 2 children's homes during the first 5 years, 4 homes during the following 4 years, and 6 homes during the following 10 years. Each home will use 2 gallons of milk per day.

7. Assumption: Liberty Youth Ranch will serve 16 children the first 5 years, 32 children the following 4 years, and 48 children the following 10 years. Each child will receive 2 dental check-ups per year.

8. Assumption: Each child will receive 2 bicycles during their stay at Liberty. Number of children served is assumed to be 144, as noted above.

9. Assumption: Liberty Youth Ranch will serve 16 children the first 5 years, 32 children the following 4 years, and 48 children the following 10 years. Each child will attend church and related activities twice per week.

10 . Assumption: Liberty Youth Ranch will serve 16 children the first 5 years, 32 children the following 4 years, and 48 children the following 10 years. Each child will receive 1 hour of counseling per week.

11. Assumption: Liberty Youth Ranch will have 2 children's homes during the first 5 years, 4 homes during the following 4 years, and 6 homes during the following 10 years. Each home will have a tutor available to help the children for 5 hours in the afternoon, Monday through Friday.

12. Assumption: Liberty Youth Ranch will serve 16 children the first 5 years, 32 children the following 4 years, and 48 children the following 10 years. Each child will have the opportunity six days per week to participate in extracurricular activities at school or on the Liberty campus.

13. Assumption: Liberty Youth Ranch will serve 16 children the first 5 years, 32 children the following 4 years, and 48 children the following 10 years.

14. Children's Defense Fund, The State of America's Children Yearbook 2001, Moments in America for Children, available at http://www.childrensdefense.org/factsfigures_moments.htm.

15. HomeSafenet report "Children Active as Case Dependents by Primary Worker- As of 02/28/2003", provided by Susan Chase, Data Support Administrator - Family Safety, Florida Department of Children and Families.

16. Child Welfare League of America, National Fact Sheet 2003, available at
http://www.cwla.org/advocacy/nationalfactsheet03.htm.

17. Child Welfare League of America, National Fact Sheet 2003, available at http://www.cwla.org/advocacy/national factsheet03.htm.

18. Ibid.

19. Child Welfare League of America, National Fact Sheet 2002.

20. Ibid.

21. Child Welfare League of America, National Fact Sheet 2003, available at http://www.cwla.org/advocacy/nationalfactsheet03.htm.

22. Ibid.

23. Seamark Ranch Inc. Ministry Plan, April 2002, Jacksonville, Florida.

24. Ibid.

25. Child Welfare League of America, National Fact Sheet 2003, available at http://www.cwla.org/advocacy/nationalfactsheet03.htm.

26. Child Welfare League of America, National Fact Sheet 2002.

27. Children's Defense Fund, The State of America's Children Yearbook 2001, 25 Key Facts About American Children, available at http://www.childrensdefense.org/keyfacts.htm.

28. Children's Defense Fund, The State of America's Children Yearbook 2001, Every Day in America, available at http://www.childrensdefense.org/everyday.htm.

29. Children's Defense Fund, Children in Florida, January 2003, available at http://www.childrensdefense.org.

30. Kids Count Data Book: 2002 State Profiles of Child Well-Being, p. 46.

31. Kids Count census data online at www.aecf.org, provided by The Annie E. Casey Foundation. Analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Census Summary File.

32. 2002 Florida's Children At A Glance data pages, Center for the Study of Children's Futures, Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, University of South Florida, provided by Susan Weitzel, Program Director.

33. Annual Statistical Data Tables, Fiscal Year 2000-2001, Florida Abuse Hotline Information System (FAHIS), Florida Department of Children and Families, available at http://www5.myflorida.com/cf_web/myflorida2/healthhuman/childabuse/pubs.html.

34. Ibid.

35. Ibid.

36. Ibid.

37. Seamark Ranch Inc. Ministry Plan, April 2002, Jacksonville, Florida.

38. HomeSafenet report "Children Active as Case Dependents by Primary Worker- As of 02/28/2003", provided by Susan Chase, Data Support Administrator - Family Safety, Florida Department of Children and Families.

39. "Measuring the Length of Stay Experiences of Florida's Foster Children", p.1, through a partnership of the Consortium for Child Welfare Studies at the Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute - University of South Florida and the Florida Department of Children and Families.

40. 2002 Florida's Children At A Glance data pages, Center for the Study of Children's Futures, Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, University of South Florida, available at www.floridakidscount.org.

41. Annual Statistical Data Tables, Fiscal Year 2000-2001, Florida Abuse Hotline Information System (FAHIS), Florida Department of Children and Families, available at http://www5.myflorida.com/cf_web/myflorida2/healthhuman/childabuse/pubs.html.

42. Ibid.

43. Ibid.

44. Debbie Webb, Communications, District Eight, Florida Department of Children and Families.

45.HomeSafenet report "Children Active as Case Dependents by Primary Worker- As of 02/28/2003", provided by Susan Chase, Data Support Administrator - Family Safety, Florida Department of Children and Families.

46.Hallie Devlin, Program Administrator, District Eight, Florida Department of Children and Families.

47. Nancy Starr, Consumer Protection and Licensing, District Eight, Florida Department of Children and Families.

48. Susan McLauchlin, Florida Department of Health, Children's Medical Services, Child Protection Unit.

49. The Foster Care Council of Southwest Florida, Office of Executive Director, available at www.napleswinefestival.com/beneficiaries/charities/fcc.html.













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